Various – Lost & Forgotten Jukebox – Tranny &…

Image: 1587241 Despite what many would have us believe, not every ‘hit record’ is listed in the dreaded Guinness Book Of Hit Singles. Let’s face it, quite apart from the fact that the ‘official’ early 60s charts have long since been exposed as deeply flawed, it should be remembered that not every track which became popular was issued as an A-side. Back in the day, many EPs sold in copious amounts (as is well documented, several sold in sufficient quantities to be included in the NME, Melody Maker and Disc singles’ chart listings - but not Record Retailer’s, hence they’re not perceived as having been hits), whilst any number of LP tracks received significant radio airplay. Ditto some truly memorable B-sides, many of which were also massive jukebox hits, some even making the lower reaches of various hit parades (although again, often not Record Retailer’s) under their own steam.

Moreover, there’s a whole raft of 45s which were hugely popular and are fondly remembered as hits, although they may have enjoyed only the briefest of passing acquaintances with the Top 50, whilst there is yet another, even bigger tranche of muchloved oldies, all of whom seemed equally popular in terms of radio and jukebox play at the time, yet somehow failed even to breach the charts. This compilation covers all bases. I remember virtually all these sides either from contemporaneous radio or jukebox play or, in some instances, from mates owning copies and playing them to death - which,to my mind, qualifies them as bona fide turntable hits. Over and above their various hit singles and LPs, most of the major stars of the era sold truckloads of EPs, none more so than The Shadows, whose ‘Mustang’ was the plug track on their eponymous, debut EP. A massive seller, it topped the EP charts for 20-weeks between January and June 1961 - a year in which they would top the EP listings for an astonishing forty-three weeks! Their lead singer, Cliff Richard, of course registered strongly with the Expresso Bongo movie soundtrack (featuring the rather twee ‘Shrine On The Second Floor’), which had topped the EP listings and made a significant dent in the singles’ Top 20 a year earlier. Whilst we’re talking film soundtracks, Anthony Newley had likewise made the singles charts with the Idle On Parade EP (check out ‘Saturday Night Rock- A-Boogie’) back in ’59, whilst Billy Fury scored heavily across the Summer and Autumn of ’62 with his Play It Cool four-tracker.

Elsewhere, although Nina & Frederick struggled to make the Top 50 in early 1960 with the gentle ‘Listen To The Ocean’, the EP from whence it was culled, Nina & Frederick Vol.1, would spend more than 2-years (a staggering 115-weeks) on the EP charts, peaking at #2. Other big-selling EPs around this time included Emile Ford’s chart-topping Emile (featuring ‘Red Sails In The Sunset’), Lonnie Donegan’s Jerry Leiber & Mike Stoller-produced Yankee Doodle Donegan (containing a great version of The Coasters’ ‘Sorry But I’m Gonna Have To Pass’), which he recorded in New York, schoolgirl sensation Helen Shapiro’s unlikely quartet of oldies, Helen (on which the standout track was ‘After You’ve Gone’), which topped the EP charts for 9-weeks at the end of 1961, and yodelling Scotsman Karl Denver’s bizarre By A Sleepy Lagoon, from which we’ve plucked the mighty ‘Snow Shoes Thompson’. Erhältlich ab 07.03.2014

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