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  • Billy Joe Shaver – Long In The Tooth (Gatefold LP+MP3)

    Sektion: Musik, Neue Releases

    Image: 1590575 Deluxe LP-vinyl packaging in gatefold sleeve with printed lyrics to sing along and additional leaflet. "I'm listening to Billy Joe Shaver and I'm reading James Joyce" (Bob Dylan)

    BILLY JOE SHAVER RELEASES LONG IN THE TOOTH, HIS FIRST NEW STUDIO ALBUM SINCE EVERYBODY’S BROTHER IN 2008, OUT AUGUST 5 ON LIGHTNING ROD RECORDS

    Legendary Texas outlaw songwriter celebrates upcoming 75th birthday with “the best album I’ve ever done.”

    WACO, Texas — Billy Joe Shaver’s finest songs prowl (“Hard To Be an Outlaw”) and punch (“Music City USA”) with welterweight fury. Evidence: The legendary outlaw’s seamless Long in the Tooth. Shaver’s first studio album in six years showcases a singular songwriter in absolutely peak form as he unearths his trademark truths around every corner (“Last Call for Alcohol,” “The Git Go”). “This is the best album I’ve ever done,” he says. “It’s just dangerously good. I expect it to change things and turn things around the way Honky Tonk Heroes did.”

    Long in the Tooth, set for August 5, 2014 release on Lightning Rod Records through Thirty Tigers, charts his journey as an unrepentant outlaw. Accordingly, Shaver delivers the classic country fans expect but also brings all new sonic tricks this time around. “Each song is different with different beats and different kinds of music,” he says. “I even have one rap song. The titles are all so catchy like ‘It’s Hard to Be an Outlaw’ and ‘The Git Go.’ Those are pretty hard to beat. Songwriting is gut wrenching, but if you dig down and write real honest you’ll find something real great. I believe everybody should write. It’s the cheapest psychiatrist there is and, God knows, I still need one.”

    Long in the Tooth spotlights all the highs, lows and in-betweens from Shaver’s storied career, an evolving narrative never short on color. “The record’s about me,” says Shaver, who turns 75 years old in August. “I’ve written a lot of great songs and I’m still writing great songs, but I felt neglected. I have been, actually. The reluctance to play old people’s music is as bad as it was to play young people’s music. I think it should level out where everyone can hear good art, but it seems like radio doesn’t play older people’s music. Man, it’s like throwing out the Mona Lisa. I don’t understand, but I’m just so proud of Long in the Tooth. This record will be a gigantic step.”

    Of course, Honky Tonk Heroes was the record that skyrocketed Shaver into public consciousness four decades ago. Waylon Jennings’ landmark album delivered Shaver-written classics practically every measure: “Old Five and Dimers Like Me,” “Willy the Wandering Gypsy and Me,” “Ride Me Down Easy,” the title track and the Top 10 hit “You Asked Me To.” In fact, 10 of the album’s 11 songs were written or co-written by Shaver. It established him as a singular songwriter, a man whose earthy poetry resonates across the board. He’s doubled down ever since.

    No one sings Shaver’s songs like the man himself, but plenty have tried: Everyone from Johnny Cash (“I’m Just an Old Chunk of Coal”) and Tom T. Hall (“Willy the Wandering Gypsy and Me”) to the Allman Brothers (“Sweet Mama”) and Asleep at the Wheel (“Way Down Texas Way”) has cut his tunes. “That’s kind of like my trophies,” Shaver admits. “Instead of getting CMA Awards, that means a whole lot more to me. When you write songs, and you write good songs, people will always remember you. Words will always outlive us. And if your name is attached to those words, you’re gonna live forever.”

    Shaver spins yarns linking sacred (“Jesus Christ, What a Man”) and secular (“That’s What She Said Last Night”) with a devil’s grin. High watermarks have become instant standards (“Georgia on a Fast Train”). “These days it seems that every young songwriter in Texas wants to grow up to be Billy Joe Shaver,” Kinky Friedman wrote recently. “Like the defenders of the Alamo, I predict that one day they’ll be naming schools after Billy Joe, the man who wrote the immortal lines: ‘I got a good Christian raisin’/And an eighth grade education/Ain’t no need in y’all treatin’ me this way.”

    His most wistful (“Live Forever”) and weary (“Blood Is Thicker Than Water”) blur lines between life and art. In fact, Shaver, who lost parts of four fingers in an early sawmill accident, has lived through several tragedies that could serve as blueprints for teary country songs. Most notably, he endured the “cosmic misfortune” of his mother, first wife and only son (guitarist Eddy Shaver) dying within a year of one another. Life’s simply treated him hard. Shaver hasn’t aged gracefully, either. (Spin “Wacko from Waco” for his account of shooting a man in the face outside Papa Joe’s Texas Saloon in spring 2007.)

    The Corsicana, Texas native’s Lone Star State roots run deep: His great-great-great grandfather, Revolutionary War veteran Evan Thomas Watson, was one of the founders of the Republic. Shaver was raised in hardscrabble circumstances by his grandmother, working on farms and selling newspapers on the street in his youth. He sang and made up songs “since I could talk,” and was inspired in his childhood to keep at it after sneaking out of home one night to catch a country music show where he heard Hank Williams early in his career.

    He drew a connection between country and blues from an uncle’s record collection and the neighboring African-American farm workers’ music. “Country music is really close to being the blues, and rock ’n’ roll ain't nothing but the blues with a beat. That’s about it," he says. Shaver was given a Gene Autry guitar by his grandmother at age 11 and began playing until his stepfather gave it away a few years later as payment for yard work. Following a brief stint in the Navy at age 16, a stab at professional rodeo, and the aforementioned incident losing parts of his fingers, Shaver took up playing guitar again and devoted himself to songwriting.

    He hitchhiked to Nashville in 1965 and eventually earned a $50-a-week writer’s deal with Bobby Bare’s publishing company. Soon Jennings picked up those Shaver classics for Honk Tonk Heroes. As the Washington Post notes, “When the country outlaws were collecting their holy writings, Billy Joe Shaver was carving out Exodus.” He followed his debut on the Monument label with three albums on Capricorn Records and two on Columbia through 1987, seeing little commercial success with his recordings but winning rave reviews and the admiration of his musical peers.

    In 1993, he broke through with new generations and broader audiences as the currently booming Americana and Texas roots music and singer-songwriter scenes were gathering steam with the acclaimed Tramp On Your Street, united with his late guitar-playing son Eddy as simply Shaver. He has since issued 11 more independent albums, was honored with the first Americana Music Award for Lifetime Achievement in Songwriting in 2002, and inducted into the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame in 2004.

    As his well deserved public recognition came in the 1990s, Shaver was cast by his friend and fan Robert Duvall in his acclaimed 1996 film The Apostle, and has since played parts in three other theatrical and TV movies. He was the subject of a 2004 documentary produced by Duvall, A Portrait of Billy Joe, and published his autobiography, Honky Tonk Hero, the following year. He also sings the themes to the Adult Swim television show Squidbillies, and “Live Forever” was included in the award-winning hit movie Crazy Heart as its end-credit song.

    With these accomplishments behind him, Shaver has been thinking his creative well finally dried up. After all, he hasn’t released an album with new songs in six years. Thankfully, he was wrong. Credit East Nashville’s favorite son with lighting the fire. “I didn’t think I had another hope in the world of doing another studio album,” Shaver says. “Then Todd Snider encouraged me to come up to Nashville and I listened. I knew if I didn’t come out with new songs, it wouldn’t be right. I’ve promised hundreds of critics that I would. So, I just buckled down and got the new songs together. Sure enough, it turned out great.” Erhältlich ab 08.08.2014 Getaggt mit:
  • Amanda Shires – Down Fell the Doves

    Sektion: Musik, Neue Releases

    Image: 1582243 Amanda Shires landete überall, von NPR Tiny Desk zu der Grand Ole Opry, und auf dem Cover von Texas Music als Künstler des Jahres im Jahr 2011. Jetzt ist sie zurück mit mit ihrem neuen Album "Down Fell The Doves" auf Lightning Rod Records. Das Album enthält elf neue Original-Songs von Amanda Shires, zum Leben erweckt durch eine Stimme, die schmilzt, eine Geige, die verwelkt, und Gitarren - gespielt zum größten Teil von ihrem Ehemann, Jason Isbell - die kratzen und heulen. Shires hat sich auf "Down Fell the Doves" zu einer wirklich originellen Stimme gemausert. Das Album wurde von Andy LeMaster (Bright Eyes, REM) produziert und in seinem Chase Park Transduction Studio in Athens, GA aufgenommen. In Nashville, Texas begann Shires im Alter von zehn Jahren Geige zu spielen. Mit 15 trat sie den Texas Playboys bei, der ehemaligen Begleitband von Western Swing-Pionier Bob Wills. In jüngerer Zeit absolvierte sie Tourneen und Aufnahmen mit Snider und Justin Townes Earle, der über sie sagt: "Mit einer Stimme die Dolly flüstert und Texte die Faulkner schreien, glänzt dieses Mädchen wie ein Diamant." Erhältlich ab 01.11.2013 Getaggt mit:
  • David Kitt – Yous (All City)

    Sektion: Highlights

    David KittNach über neun Jahren veröffentlicht der irische Singer/Songwriter David Kitt (ehemals Rough Trade Records) wieder ein neues Soloalbum. Die letzten Jahre im musikalischen Leben des David Kitt waren bestimmt vom Touren und Aufnehmen als Teil der Tindersticks, dem Erkunden von Techno, Disco und House unter seinem Alias New Jackson, dem Remixen von Künstlern wie The xx oder Shit Robot und dem Produzieren von DJ-Sets, Radiosendungen und anderen Künstlern. Sein neues Solowerk seit langer Zeit (“Yous” ist der Plural aus Kompletter Artikel →

    Getaggt mit: , ,
  • The Black Keys – Rubber Factory

    Sektion: Musik, Neue Releases

    Image: 1589543 Feeling heartsick from love's tumult, sweating bullets in the middle of the night, drinking lightning from a corn liquor bottle, sitting in a room whose walls are so blue they look black, digging into the joy-and-pain double helix of existence and finding heavy soul, kicking out a blues rock rumpus in search of salvation...this is the electrifying world of The Black Keys and their sophomore album thickfreakness.

    2002 was a heckuva year for The Black Keys (Dan Auerbach, vocals and guitar, Patrick Carney, drums and production). The true-school two-piece came roaring straight of out Akron, Ohio with a debut album The Big Come-Up on the tiny Alive label that garnered barely-contained raves in Rolling Stone, Spin, The Village Voice and MOJO. One listen to The Big Come Up -- a startling raw slab of juke-joint blues -- validated the band's rapid ascent from playing for no money on the bottom of the bill at Cleveland's Beachland Tavern to selling out blistering headline dates and being invited to open for the Jon Spencer Blues Explosion and (on New Year's Eve) elder Ohio statesmen Guided By Voices.

    With all the righteous acclaim, the band was inevitably enticed by big league offers like so many glasses of carrot juice dangled at the end of an electric cattle prod. But after the results of a trial session in a swank California recording studio proved thoroughly unsatisfying, the band hooked up with Fat Possum Records and reconnoitered back in Akron to craft their Fat Possum debut. Descending to the dank cellar of Carney's Minimum Wage Studio, the pair dove into 14 straight hours of recording. With no one else in the studio, and Carney dashing back and forth between his drumkit and the mixing board, the two-man immersion tank/musical incubator came alive. "Nothing like being in your own basement surrounded by your own garbage," says Carney (who incidentally is the nephew of Tom Waits' longtime sax sideman Ralph Carney). Erhältlich ab 06.06.2014 Getaggt mit:
  • The Black Keys – Chulahoma

    Sektion: Musik, Neue Releases

    Image: 1589546 Feeling heartsick from love's tumult, sweating bullets in the middle of the night, drinking lightning from a corn liquor bottle, sitting in a room whose walls are so blue they look black, digging into the joy-and-pain double helix of existence and finding heavy soul, kicking out a blues rock rumpus in search of salvation...this is the electrifying world of The Black Keys and their sophomore album thickfreakness.

    2002 was a heckuva year for The Black Keys (Dan Auerbach, vocals and guitar, Patrick Carney, drums and production). The true-school two-piece came roaring straight of out Akron, Ohio with a debut album The Big Come-Up on the tiny Alive label that garnered barely-contained raves in Rolling Stone, Spin, The Village Voice and MOJO. One listen to The Big Come Up -- a startling raw slab of juke-joint blues -- validated the band's rapid ascent from playing for no money on the bottom of the bill at Cleveland's Beachland Tavern to selling out blistering headline dates and being invited to open for the Jon Spencer Blues Explosion and (on New Year's Eve) elder Ohio statesmen Guided By Voices.

    With all the righteous acclaim, the band was inevitably enticed by big league offers like so many glasses of carrot juice dangled at the end of an electric cattle prod. But after the results of a trial session in a swank California recording studio proved thoroughly unsatisfying, the band hooked up with Fat Possum Records and reconnoitered back in Akron to craft their Fat Possum debut. Descending to the dank cellar of Carney's Minimum Wage Studio, the pair dove into 14 straight hours of recording. With no one else in the studio, and Carney dashing back and forth between his drumkit and the mixing board, the two-man immersion tank/musical incubator came alive. "Nothing like being in your own basement surrounded by your own garbage," says Carney (who incidentally is the nephew of Tom Waits' longtime sax sideman Ralph Carney). Erhältlich ab 23.05.2014 Getaggt mit:
  • The Black Keys – Thickfreakness

    Sektion: Musik, Neue Releases

    Image: 1589541 Feeling heartsick from love's tumult, sweating bullets in the middle of the night, drinking lightning from a corn liquor bottle, sitting in a room whose walls are so blue they look black, digging into the joy-and-pain double helix of existence and finding heavy soul, kicking out a blues rock rumpus in search of salvation...this is the electrifying world of The Black Keys and their sophomore album thickfreakness.

    2002 was a heckuva year for The Black Keys (Dan Auerbach, vocals and guitar, Patrick Carney, drums and production). The true-school two-piece came roaring straight of out Akron, Ohio with a debut album The Big Come-Up on the tiny Alive label that garnered barely-contained raves in Rolling Stone, Spin, The Village Voice and MOJO. One listen to The Big Come Up -- a startling raw slab of juke-joint blues -- validated the band's rapid ascent from playing for no money on the bottom of the bill at Cleveland's Beachland Tavern to selling out blistering headline dates and being invited to open for the Jon Spencer Blues Explosion and (on New Year's Eve) elder Ohio statesmen Guided By Voices.

    With all the righteous acclaim, the band was inevitably enticed by big league offers like so many glasses of carrot juice dangled at the end of an electric cattle prod. But after the results of a trial session in a swank California recording studio proved thoroughly unsatisfying, the band hooked up with Fat Possum Records and reconnoitered back in Akron to craft their Fat Possum debut. Descending to the dank cellar of Carney's Minimum Wage Studio, the pair dove into 14 straight hours of recording. With no one else in the studio, and Carney dashing back and forth between his drumkit and the mixing board, the two-man immersion tank/musical incubator came alive. "Nothing like being in your own basement surrounded by your own garbage," says Carney (who incidentally is the nephew of Tom Waits' longtime sax sideman Ralph Carney).
    Erhältlich ab 23.05.2014 Getaggt mit:
  • Black Plus – All My Relations

    Sektion: Musik, Neue Releases

    Image: 1578742 Black Pus is Brian Chippendale, who rose to prominence as the drummer of noise rock titans Lightning Bolt and Mindflayer. The first Black Pus CD-R was self released in early 2006, and was a collection of ferocious free jazz, multi-tracked on Chippendale’s cassette fourtrack. Enamored of the control of recording solo, Chippendale followed with more CD-Rs, and began playing live under the Black Pus moniker. He refined the Black Pus sound over numerous selfreleased CDs and 2011’s Primordial Pus on Load Records, replacing the saxophone with a drum-mounted oscillator and experimenting with pop structures. The oscillator creates gigantic bass tones that are then fed through a series of pedals. Over the course of the past several years Chippendale has been hand-picked by Björk and The Flaming Lips as a collaborator, and recruited by Andrew W.K. for Lee “Scratch” Perry’s 2008 album Repentance.
    All My Relations is constant forward motion and audible physicality. Chippendale’s furious drumming style is ever present and instantly recognizable, but the pop element, which Chippendale explored in more contained ways on earlier Black Pus releases, is more fully integrated. Tracks like “1000 Years” and “Hear No Evil” bear a snarl and a smile, the sound of wild abandon that is both aggressive and
    inviting. Chippendale creates maximalist music out of the simple elements of drums, vocals, and an oscillator triggered by the kick drum, looping and repeating phrases and rhythms in a way that can
    only be called meditative. The album closes with “A Better Man,” an almost ten minute epic that expertly alternates between the minimal pulse of the kick drum and oscillator and some of the most voracious and unrestrained drumming on the album.
    For the first time with any group he’s been a part of, Chippendale fully embraced the studio to realize All My Relations. He entrusted recording and producing to Keith Souza and Seth Manchester (who have worked with The Body, Battles and The Skull Defekts) at Machines with Magnets in Pawtucket, RI. All My Relations retains the expansive, primal sound of Chippendale’s earlier recordings, enhanced by the clarity of the studio. Black Pus has attained vicious transcendence.

    SALES POINTS
    Black Pus is the solo project of Brian Chippendale of noise rock titans Lightning Bolt and Mindflayer.
    All My Relations is the first Black Pus album recorded in a proper studio and follows a series of self-released CDrs and 2011’s album Primordial Pus (Load Records)
    In addition to his work in both Lightning Bolt and Mindflayer Chippendale has collaborated with Björk, The Flaming Lips, Boredoms, Andrew W.K. and Lee “Scratch” Perry Chippendale is also a renowned visual artist (his artwork adorns All My Relations) and was a founder of the legendary Providence, RI warehouse/venue/arts space Fort Thunder
    CD version packaged in 4 panel mini-LP style gatefold package with high gloss printing. LP version pressed on high quality virgin vinyl and packaged in an LP jacket with high gloss printing as well as
    full color artworked inner sleeve and free download coupon.

    “Gutterall teutonic death marches laced with vocals recorded with a gas mask in a boiler room” - Foxy Digitalis

    “the abstract wall of sound instigates both moshing and the sort of transcendent elation achieved only with frightening volume levels” - The Believer

    “one of the most distinct musicians and visual artists of our time” - WFMU Erhältlich ab 22.03.2013 Getaggt mit:

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